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Iefje Eva Herweyer

Female 1854 - 1872  (17 years)


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  • Name Iefje Eva Herweyer  [1, 2, 3
    Birth 19 July 1854  Strijen, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Born 13 August 1854  Strijen, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 3, 4
    Gender Female 
    Residence 06 October 1868  Big Rapids, Mecosta, Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Left Ottawa county to winter in Big Rapids on the way to Missaukee 
    Residence April 1869  Vogel Center, Missaukee, Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [6, 7
    The Founding of Vogel Center 
    Residence 1870  Reeder, Missaukee, Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Died 04 April 1872  Missaukee County, Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Buried after 04 April 1872  Vogel Center, Missaukee County, Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    • Vogel Center Cemetery
    Person ID I3535  Koster

    Father Otto Herweijer,   b. 07 March 1815, Strijen, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 January 1896, Muskegon, Muskegon, Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years) 
    Relationship Natural 
    Mother Aagje DenHertog,   b. 14 May 1818, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 November 1910, Muskegon, Muskegon, Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 92 years) 
    Relationship Natural 
    Married 28 April 1842  Strijen, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F521  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Sources 
    1. [S52] 1870 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Name: The Generations Network, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2003;), Database online. Year: 1870; Census Place: Reeder, Missaukee, Michigan; Roll: M593_; Page: ; Image: .
      Record for Eva Herweger

    2. [S330] U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1700s-Current, Ancestry.com, (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2012;).
      Record for Iefje Herweyer

    3. [S140] Dutch Immigrants to America, 1820-1880, Swierenga, Robert P, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.Original data - Various Ports. Copies of Lists of Passengers Arriving at Miscellaneous Ports on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts and at Ports on the Great Lakes, 1820--1873. M575. National;).
      Record for Efie Herweijer

    4. [S40] Genlias Database, http://www.genlias.nl/en/searchDetail.jsp?val=12&xtr=20400072&vgr=1.
      Source Civil register - Birth
      Archive location Stadsarchief Dordrecht / DiEP
      General Municipality: Strijen
      Type of record: Geboorteakte
      Record number: 89
      Registration date: 15-08-1854
      Child Iefje Herweijer
      Gender: V
      Abandoned child: N
      Date of birth: 13-08-1854
      Place of birth: Strijen
      Father Otto Herweijer
      Mother Aagje den Hartog


    5. [S243] Memoir of John Vogel, Jan Vogel, (Name: Michigan History Magazine; Date: July-September, 1946;).
      "On August 1, 1865, after the war had come to an end I received my discharge while in Harper Hospital in Detroit."

    6. [S242] Netherlanders In America, Henry S. Lucas, (Name: University of Michigan Publications; Location: Ann Arbor;), page 149-150.
      Another new comer who settled in Nordeloos was Jan Vogel. Bom in 1839 in Gliessen Nieuwkerk, in the province of Zuid-Holland, Vogel moved to nearby Noordeloos, where he went to school until his tweflth year. His help, however, was needed to upport. the family, and Jan was apprenticed to a carpenter, on Hermanus Diepenhorst.
      Diepenshorst,, two and one-half years later, determined to emigrate to Michigan, and Jan's father consented to his son's going along in the hope that the boy might ultimately help him emigrate, Also. Diepenhorst paid Vogel's expenses, which amounted to $54. Together they sailed in 1854 from Rotterdam to Hull, and from Liverpool to New York. where they arrived on September 20. Within a week they were in Holland, Michigan, and, after some investigation, they settled in what was to become Noordeloos.

      Vogel worked as a skilled carpenter. He served honorably in the army during the Civil War, taking part in many battles. Discharged in 1865, he paid a visit that same year to the Netherlands, and returned with his parents, his sister, and his brother-m-law. He acquired a part interest in a sawmill at Noordeloos in 1866 and added to it a gristmill which he installed with his own hands. In the following year his mill burned, and, once more in debt, Vogel returned to his former work as a carpenter. Even though his relations with the community of Noordeloos were somewhat intermittent, Vogel contributed materially to the life of that community, which became a flourishing farming center after the Civil War. But Vogel's most significant achievement--to be described in a later chapter--was the founding in April 1869 of Vogel Center in Missaukee County, Michigan.

    7. [S242] Netherlanders In America, Henry S. Lucas, (Name: University of Michigan Publications; Location: Ann Arbor;), page 300ff.
      This pioneer [John Vogel], whose career has been. sketched earlier [page 149], had settled in Noordeloos. after serving honorably in the Civil War, he visited the Netherlands and then settled in Noordeloos. Here he invested in mill, which burned down in February 1867. As there was a great demand for land, and the sipply of desirable land In the Settlement was
      limited, Vogel turned his attention to northern Michigan. His 'Memoir''' relates the circumstances:

      "By this time Ottawa County was thickly settled by Hollanders, and there was much demand for farming land. Many of our people began to discuss the advisability of opening up new settlements, mentlon being made especially of good government lands north of BIg RapIds, MIchigan. There was much discussion of the subject; meetings were held, and it was decIded that as I possesed more knowledge of forests and had had more experience in seeing lands, I should inspect the area proposed for settlement. Three other persons were chosen to accompany me, to serve as companions and help me in passing judgment upon the quality of the land to be visited.

      "Early in October 1867 we started in a wagon for Big Rapids and Hersey. From Hersey we went on foot northeast along the Branch and Clam rivers, investigating government land along the Clam River, which to our party appeared excellent for farming. After two weeks we returned and made our report. This task finished, I went to Grand Haven, walking all the way, proceeded by boat to Manistee, walked from Manistee to Traverse City, where on November 7, 1867, together with three other persons--the first white people to do so--we took up homesteads in Missaukee County. Next we traveled afoot from Grand Traverse to Missaukee County, sixty miles distant, through a dense forest without a road to follow. From there we went on foot back. to NoordeIoos, there being no railroad or other means of transportatlon in that SectIon of the country at that time."

      After these preliminary arrangements were completed, Vogel, his Wife, and his child Derkje, his wife's brother Jakob and sister Elftje, together with Hendrik Zagers and his wife, Hendrik Westveld, and Jan Abbing set out on October 6, 1868. They apparently spent the wInter months in Big Rapids. In the spring they set forth agaIn, And after traveling twelve days in an ox-drawn wagon, they arrived on Apnl 28, 1869, at what was to be known as Vogel Center. This community flourished from the start; since it was located in the heart of the lumber
      country, the men could readily find work in the surrounding camps, In addition, the people of Vogel Center discovered that logging camps proveded a steady market for hay, grain, fodder, as well as butter, meat, and vegetables. Thus ausipiciously started, the settlement grew streadily, alothough for some years it was isolated. No railroad came within twenty miles, and a post office was not opened until 1878.

    8. [S38] Online Resource, U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current - Ancestry.com. search.ancestry.com.


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