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John Lovejoy

Male about 1622 - 1690  (~ 68 years)


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  • Name John Lovejoy 
    Born about 1622  London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 7 November 1690  Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • From The Townsman, Andover Historical Series, by Charlotte Helen Abbott.
      No. 38, Lovejoy Neighbors (A.T. 7/31/1896)
      Transcription to electronic form by Jerry Hersey Lovejoy 7/14/1999, http://home.attbi.com/~bennabre/cha.htm.

      The inter marriages with the Lovejoy family sons numerous in both the lines of George of the North and South Parishes, seem to show some relation between the Osgoods and Abbotts and the first John Lovejoy who married Mary Osgood, daughter of Christopher of Ipswich, and appeared on the list of the first seventeen of the pioneers. He signs the 1658 petition that has the autographs of seventeen of our fathers. I think the first Lovejoy farms will prove to be on or near the site of the present Downing place, and the second best location near the Snow farm or better still on the site of the Moses Foster estate. These farms lay on the circumference of the Lovejoy grants at any rate, along the oldest roads.

      The youngest son Ebenezer was heir to the homestead proper and married into the Foster line of Andrew; while the eldest grandson John whose bounds are near him, married the daughter of William Blunt who owned along "Missionary Ridge." South parish farmers married neighbors daughters almost without exception and so we are all double and twisted cousins over here .

      Mary Osgood's life was a quiet one so far as the records and probably one of hard work as she died in 1675, while John was still acquiring acres for his boys. Mary, her eldest, had married John Wilson down at the "Corners", but the rest had yet to be placed. Hanna Pritchard came in 1675 to live with John "thirteen comfortable years" as he relates in the will of 1690 when the prematurely old man is ready to leave this "vale of tears" where grief waited upon him. Three years after Mary Osgood left her baby Ebenezer to Hanna's care, Sara married William Johnson, one of the active, almost turbulent spirits that seemed to animate the boys of the John Johnson line from Ipswich. John Lovejoy, eldest son, married that same year Naomi Hoyt from Newbury or Amesbury, daughter of the emigrant John and his second wife Frances. She was probably a woman of great beauty without moral backbone to balance. In 1667, her sister Dorothy famous as a "new woman" having rashly "put on men's clothes." Father Hoyt and all the neighbors swarm to the Norfolk court where Amesbury people were disciplined and "manifested the great appearance of said Dorothy's repentance." But the hard hearts agree to whip her when she comes back into the county, if 40 shillings fine in corn and money is not paid immediately. The neighbors help out and Dorothy settles down in feminine fashion.

      John and Naomi live together only three years when he leaves her a widow with a small estate, and a young Frances, and infant John to manage. Four years later, the sorrow of a great social tragedy broods over the two homesteads on the hill side, and cuts deep scars into the memories of two other allied families. Frances is taken into her grandfather's home to rear, young John remaining with his mother. The simple entry on the Town Records is all we catch of what was only one, perhaps of many such tragedies falsely called "romances," that shadowed the Puritan life in the backwoods as it does all frontier life everywhere. But the standard at Andover and even at Newbury and the older towns was high compared with that of the old court circles and middle class life of England as the nickname "Puritan" testifies. Public sentiment was slowly educated into decency, but the frantic, efforts of the "powers" in 1670 had little effect further. Generations of homes must come and pass before we even of today get far beyond our parents' methods and failures.

      John's will does not mention widow John or grandson John except to allude to bounds, - but tells Frances to stay with grandmother and young uncle Ebenezer then seventeen till her marriage, when she will be well provided with clothes. Thomas Osgood the Ipswich brother-in-law, who settles here, is the adviser and friend of these older brothers William and Joseph ,who are to help Ebenezer to make bargains during his "nonage," to exercise a parent's care over Frances and to do naught to grieve the mother in her old age "as you expect the blessing of God." Ben, his fifth son, had just died a soldier at Permaquid and the father buys his land for Nathaniel now of age, who in 1694 goes to Amesbury or Haverhill for the daughter Dorothy Hoyt, of Sergeant John Hoyt of the second generation. Her sister Naomi Hoyt also comes to marry John Barnard, and as wives and mothers do honor to the Hoyts. Sergeant Hoyt loses his home by fire and plunder in the Indian raid of 1696 and is killed on the way from Andover to Haverhill with young Peters in August. In the next generation, our young Ebenezer finds over at John Barnard's a worthy daughter Naomi. Amy Barnard the mother lived to be 90, dying in 1762, Amy Lovejoy to 98 dying In 1795 both outliving their husbands and administering estate with credit.

      Readers tell me that I keep back everything wrong in the lives of the ancestors. Although as a rule, it is best to put by the errors, sometimes it is well to see at a distance the Lord's way of managing men in training. One of my own grandsires on the family tree was an actor in this early episode and the Lord dealt to him, a family of sons without a daughter to brighten the home, and he was followed for years by the enmity of a woman with unsparing tongue and unfailing memory.

      Christopher, Nathaniel, William, Joseph, and Ebenezer, the five Lovejoys who helped to build up the South Parish having sixty members in the Church before the West was set off and a good dozen in the volunteers in 1776. These must none in for a later sketch when the probate papers have sorted out the heirs and filled the serious gaps in our worn town books. Of all these iron workers, tanners, lumbermen and farmers I have only traced fully two lines now resident, Ebenezer and Mary Foster, John and Hanna Foster. Anna Lovejoy the only heir in her family married George Abbott, Capt., who died in 1776, leaving his son John Lovejoy at 19 with a young brother, four sisters and his widowed mother to care for and well he did it.

      The other line is that of William and Mary Farnum. Capt. William and Sarah Frye with only two heirs, Anne who married Zebadia Abbott, trader, represented by Joseph Abbott and his late brother Herman, so well known in the South Parish, and Phebe her sister who married the Isaac Abbott of the last sketch and now including the daughters and grandchildren of Henry W. Abbott; also the children of Mary Fiske Abbott and Nathan Shattuck represented by Mrs. Omar Jenkins of High Street. An estate of interest just brought to notice is that of Orlando Lovejoy grandfather of John Holt, who still lives on Lovejoy land near Plato Eames's estate. Orlando, who married Abia Gray, is in the line of Isaac 3rd and Ruth Davis, Isaac jr. and widow Mary Wardwell, Christopher and Mary Preston, Christopher and Mary Russe, all the mothers dwellers between the two Parishes with the Lovejoys from the first. Mr. Holt's sister Ellen we all recall as the one true blonde Lovejoy in this family of the brunette strain from Gray and Davis ancestors. C.H.A.

      -------------------------------------
      From The Townsman, Andover Historical Series, by Charlotte Helen Abbott.
      No. 65, John Lovejoy’s Farms (A.T. 9/10/1897)
      Transcription to electronic form by Jerry Hersey Lovejoy 7/14/1999, http://home.attbi.com/~bennabre/cha.htm.

      In 1683, the patriarch Lovejoy gave a generous portion to his grandson John on condition that he pay the dowry of his sister or of his two youngest aunts, the widow Naomi to pay rent during her widowhood for the estate on his demand. In 1695 Nathaniel married Dorothy Holt and carried out the will of his father by paying the dowry aforesaid receiving land in exchange, and he swaps about with Ebenezer on the old home acres, until he is settled here at the boundary between the parishes, and begins to call in the paternal inheritance in sections. The great division of old John Frye held by grandchildren had come into the market, and 80 acres in the West Parish purchased by Ebenezer, Christopher and William Foster, the new pioneer over there from Boxford, kin to Abraham and Andrew already in our business center, gave Nathaniel his opportunity. Joseph moved along towards the Salem turnpike and held lands for his daughter Sara, wife of Joseph Clark. They raise and baptize a large family of children here before they go north to Souhegan selling as late as 1748, the estate of Joseph, laborer, now gentleman, valued at 452 (illegible, pounds?) to Isaac Blunt. Her brother Ben and Joseph, in their surveys of new purchases along the old Boston road that swayed from Carter's Hill, across (?) unchard Avenue to Elm Street before they signed their last papers, always kept close at Nathaniel's heels. He had four sons and two daughters to place . Timothy got some of Sarah Clark's land and somewhere about was room suitable for his Tan house. He disappears from our records in the new generation and his brother Ezekiel with his wife Elizabeth Wilson are entirely overshadowed by the rising Holt' s beams. His girls marry Haverhill and Lunenburg men and some wander to Lancaster with the Abbott emigrants. Daniel also married and Mary Holt proved an able helpmeet. I think these Holts all belonged on the Holt Row down on the Reading line, for several missing families besides Dan Lovejoy's seem to baptize infants and recognize baptismal covenants, etc. in our South church, but never appear on the town books. In this way Nathaniel with his Elizabeth Swan was the head of the North Parish line so well represented by Nathaniel, Captain, schoolteacher, outliving two brides, Elizabeth Foster and one other, marrying in old age Benjamina Woodbridge. Esquire he is when in wartime he buries his three eldest. Of those born later I could only connect Elizabeth Foster Lovejoy who married Jacob Farnum in 1798, who was drowned so soon after the home was begun, the line ending in Jacob Farnum of West Newbury, a bachelor. The other descendant was Brig. Gen. Nathaniel Lovejoy, a Harvard man, trader of North Parish.

      Of the children of Joseph only Lydia seems to have crossed the Shawshin to become the wife of her cousin CaIeb Johnson, a most interesting person belonging to the family of Lieut. William Johnson and Sara Lovejoy. There is a possibility of this family being connected with another line of Johnsons from Woburn, sympathizers, if not members of the martyr Baptist associates of Bellingham and Bradstreet persecutions. In 1714, as mentioned last week, John Lovejoy sold all his rights in the home lands to William Foster of the West Shawshin syndicate and in 1728, the fine estate so carefully builded by Lieut. William Johnson near Dea. Wm. Lovejoy's on the highway that leads to William Foster's, the Merrimac lands and Lovejoy purchase all go through Caleb and Sara's hands to the same William Foster, Pillar of Rocks near Billerica line included. Was this homestead the old house now being painted "old fashioned" that traveled down the road to Holt' s Bridge into the hollow of the Shawshin for "Master Billy's school"? Did Gideon, son of said William, build a new house on the old site left behind or did he keep the old Johnson place? At any rate, when our Dea. Ballard Lovejoy came back from Brentwood after awandering from the old home he settles down at Gideon's house and about fifty years ago built his present residence. At Joseph T. Lovejoy's near by is an old Woods house, the family of Andrew Duncklee Woods perhaps of Lovejoy kin. This is the only old house standing on the old Lovejoy division, and the Carruth estate marks the site possibly of the house longest held in the line of Ebenezer Lovejoy, who gradually took up all the estates to spare, watching the cousins flit off to Norway and Andover, Maine, and later across the Connecticut.

      The line of Joseph remained for years about Pine swamp and Carter's Hill while the Abbotts, Fosters, and Wardwells and collateral were crowing in on the older farm lands. Hugh Gordon came to town and Joseph and Mary Gordon, with Hanna her sister, wife of Thomas Wardwell, sell out in time to a hustling Lemuel Holt in the line of Henry, who had married Mehitabel in 1769. Brother Asa who seems to locate near the Worthley estate was only nineteen and seems to hold on to his share in spite of Lemuel's well laid plans. Sara Frye his wife probably brought a big dowry to help the big taxes they had begun to pay. In fact, he buys land up around the Snow farm from Lemuel. The famous Cuba woodlot goes to Lemuel from the Fryes, James and Sara, and is still in the market held by Blunts. Asa raised eleven children and went through the Revolution moving to Norway, Maine about 1800, selling his pastures to our Simon Wardwell and Ruth Church, the heirs of whom held in the present Capt. Reed place, the last of Asa Lovejoy's acres. Poor Joseph and Mary Gordon had better have gone to the dry pure air of the pine hills "down East". Consumption won many of the Lovejoy's at their prime. John, son of Joseph, followed Jacob Holt's Rhoda to Albany, Maine, where the family went over two hundred miles one winter on a sled. His sister Hanna and brother Abner died at maturity and in the South Church is recorded the baptism of the infant Amos, son of Amos and Elizabeth (Wardwell) "at his own house, sick with consumption and likely never to go out again." The next year, young Elizabeth is presented after her father's death and probably the children were brought up by Samuel Lummus, the step-father. I could not trace the children of this line to any one now resident.

      Christopher and Sara Russe sent Miriam to Robert Gray, Elizabeth and Mary to Methuen with Barkers, and Margaret after some friction on the part of her father at the time of the Banns, finally married Capt. Charles Furbush. For the story of his death in camp, at Champlain see p. 225 Bailey History. Margaret's son, a Capt. At Bunker Hill later had a tragic death, killed by his insane servant while asleep early on the winter morning in February 1795. I should like to see the record of the court on this case which might give some light on the peculiar temper of an otherwise estimable man, who like other good men in power, seems to have delighted in playing with the capricious an unmanageable creature none other cared to own out himself. He promised to make the poor man his heir and excited his cupidity. A military prowess and training often accompanies this love of "badgering" or playing with edged tools and perhaps old Christopher Lovejoy was wise. Margaret's grandson served at Bunker Hill and the family line of Furbush is well represented by the women who are sent to "bruise serpent's heads." Blessings for our Grandmothers! The three sons of this line, Hezekia, wife Hanna unknown, except from the Osgood almanac. - "Hez Lovejoy's mother died April 19, 1745." Christopher, wife Mary Preston, and Jonathan, wife Elizabeth Phelps send children to Souhegan, Hebron, Andover, Maine, and Hollis, H.H. Jonathan, who married Mary Austin 1741, I am confident will prove to be ancestor of Prof. Austin Phelps, whose father Eliakim is in some way in the West Parish line, guessing from the family names only.

      Isaac Lovejoy, son of Christopher, married Mary Pevey widow of Eliakim Wardwell, and the farms held by F.F. Wardwell and John Holt on the old Boston Road lie over the possessions of their ancestors. Isaac's Lucy raised that large family of Caleb Abbott's just under the south slope of Prospect Hill, and just here I am glad to present to you the only Andover boys of his line the sons of Nathan Abbott, the grandsons Lucy. If I had studied the school reports as carefully as I have the older records they would not have been left hidden behind their elder sisters' skirts. (Garfield must live up to his name.) Isaac and Ruth Davis left us the family of Jewett Jones and Susan, Isaac Carlton and Martha, Amos Gray and Lucy. Orlando (or Allander as Rev. Mr. Phillips had spelled it years ago) giving me more trouble than all the Lovejoys of the race. He had William, who married Phebe Stiles running in the records with William of Ebenezer's line. I have it right perhaps, in placing here the late Stephen Lovejoy an Lydia Simpson with a son Albert, and Sylvester who with Clarissa Fox was father of our voter Sylvester, and Sylvanus who lived to 80 with Sylvanus A. and Edward, besides Mary H. wife of the late Timothy Parker Holt. Every tree and stone wall around his little shoemaker's shop tell stories of the older days. Pine Swamp has filled up, and where my brother used to shoot eagles, rabbits, and woodcocks, the inevitable rural hencoop bars the way. Christopher left us Abiel Osgood and sister Anne. It was in his line that Stephen, who married Pamela Bragg came, sending back Harriet from Andover, Maine, to marry John Bodwell. I met these cousins of our Hon. Moses Stevens and Henry Bodwell lately and a neighbor who guided me there said "Nice people, very nice indeed!" Ebenezer takes a paper by himself. C.H.A.
    Person ID I52404  Schirado
    Last Modified 4 July 2012 

    Father Rowland Lovejoy,   b. 1597, St. Mary’s, Woolnoth, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother Elizabeth Neal 
    Married 7 May 1620  London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F36038  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family/Spouse 1 Mary Osgood,   b. ca 1623/4, Marlborough, Wiltshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 July 1675, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 51 years) 
    Married 1 January 1651  Ipswich, MA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Mary Lovejoy,   b. 11 April 1652, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 June 1677, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 25 years)
    +2. Sarah Lovejoy,   b. 11 April 1654, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 February 1706, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 51 years)
    +3. Dea. William Lovejoy,   b. 21 April 1656, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 July 1748, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 92 years)
    +4. John Lovejoy,   b. 1 January 1657, Ipswich, MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 February 1706  (Age 49 years)
    +5. Anne Lovejoy,   b. 21 December 1659, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 February 1724, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years)
    +6. Christopher Lovejoy,   b. 1 March 1661/2, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 March 1736/7, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
    +7. Joseph Lovejoy,   b. 8 February 1662, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 June 1737, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
     8. Benjamin Lovejoy,   b. 4 December 1664, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1689  (Age 24 years)
    +9. Nathaniel Lovejoy,   b. 29 May 1667, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 March 1752, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)
    +10. Abigail Lovejoy,   b. 20 August 1669, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 May 1747, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)
     11. Deborah Lovejoy,   b. 4 November 1671, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location
    +12. Ebenezer Lovejoy,   b. 22 January 1673, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 May 1760, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years)
    Family ID F35765  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family/Spouse 2 Hannah,   d. 1 August 1705, Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 12 January 1676/7  Andover, MA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F58797  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart


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