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Gen. Jacob Bayley

Male 1726 - 1815  (88 years)


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  • Name Jacob Bayley 
    Prefix Gen. 
    Born 19 July 1726  Newbury, MA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 1 March 1815  Newbury, Orange County, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • Jacob Bailey, surname often spelled Bayley.

      From the History of Newbury, Vermont, which has much more about his life scattered throughout the history, here is his biographical entry:
      General Jacob Bayley, son of Joshua and Sarah (Coffin) Bayley, was born at Newbury. Mass., July 19, 1726. His father was a farmer in moderate circumstances, and it is not supposed that the son received more than the rudiments of an education. He married, at the age of nineteen, Oct. 16, 1745, Prudence, daughter of Ephraim and Prudence (Stickney) Noyes, b. April 10, 1725. The name Prudence is said to have been indicative of her character. She was in the sixth generation from Nicholas Noyes of England and Ipswich, Mass., and in the 5th from William Stickney of Lincolnshire, Eng., and Rowley, Mass. Not far from 1747, they removed with others to a part, formerly, of the town of Haverhill, Mass., known as Timberland, or Haverhill district. This part of Haverhill, with a portion of Amesbury, was cut off from those towns by the state line of 1741, and became a part of New Hampshire. Jan. 12, 1749, these tracts were chartered into a town by the name of Hampstead. Jacob Bayley soon became prominent in town affairs, and in the militia. When the French and Indian war broke out, he saw service as a lieutenant, in 1756, in Capt. Alcott’s Co., after which he raised a company, of which he was chosen captain, which became a part of Col. Meserve’s regiment, and saw service on Lake George. During the siege of Fort William Henry his company comprised a portion of the garrison, and he escaped from the massacre which followed its surrender, Aug. 7, 1707, by running barefooted to Fort Edward, a distance of twelve miles, outstripping his Indian pursuers, who had destined him to run the gauntlet. For his losses at the capitulation, he was allowed the sum of £14, 11, 6, by the provincial assembly. He remained in the army much of the time till 1760, and was connected with Amherst’s expedition. In 1759, he was in command of a detachment which marched through the Mohawk Valley to Oswego. (See Journal). He was appointed lieutenant-colonel in Goff’s regiment, succeeding him as colonel, and was present at the siege and surrender of Montreal. His after career, as relates to this town and the country, forms part of the history of Newbury, and is detailed in the chapters of this history which relate to its settlement and the revolutionary war, “All of which he saw, and part of which he was.”
      The following is a concise account of the positions of trust held by him: Justice of Peace and Quorum for the whole of the New Hampshire grants by N.Y. Assembly, 1766; Representative to New York Congress, 1775; Commissioner to administer oaths of office, 1775; Judge of Inferior Court of Common Pleas, 1772-77 ; nominated Brigadier General for Gloucester and Cumberland counties, May 23, 1776; confirmed by New York Provincial Congress, Aug. 1, 1776; Delegate to Continental Congress to carry remonstrance and petition, presented April 8, 1777; Member of Convention to draft the constitution of the state, at Windsor, July 2-8, 1777 ;. Member of Council of Safety appointed at this convention July, 1777; Member of first Council in 1778; Agent to Continental Congress, 1777; Member of the Council, 1778-79, 1784-94; Member of Constitutional Convention 1773, 1793; Member of Court of Confiscation, March, 1778; Commissary General of the Northern Department, under appointment from Washington, 1777, “These positions,” says Joshua Coffin, in his History of Newbury, Mass, “involved great responsibilities, and subjected him to danger, difficulties and sacrifices of an extraordinary
      character, and many anecdotes might be related of his exploits, hair breadth escapes, encounters with the enemy, Indians and tories, his constant vigilance to escape the scouts sent from Canada to take him, for whom a reward of five hundred guineas had been offered dead or alive. By means of spies he acquired important intelligence of the movements of the enemy in Canada, and rendered great services with his purse, person and pen at and before the surrender of Burgoyne, where he was engaged with two or three of his sons. He made a treaty of friendship with the St. Francis Indians, and by his kindness to them won their attachment. Many of the tribe were of great service to the colonies during the revolutionary war. He sacrificed a large estate in the service of his country, for which he never received any compensation, and was equally distinguished for his talents, his patriotism, and his piety.” It is understood that he commanded a brigade at Saratoga, at least, practically. It is believed that losses which he suffered In his services to the patriot cause amounted to about $60,000, for which, notwithstanding his applications to Congress, he received no return. He sacrificed all his estate to pay his debts, and died a poor man. He had great talents, and his usefulness to the American cause was very great. It is unfortunate for his fame that he took the course which he did regarding the motives and operations of the Aliens, Governor Chittenden, and the other leaders of the Vermont cause. Had he understood their plans, and acted with them, his name would have gone into history second in fame to that of no man in Vermont. There has been considerable controversy as to the actual part which he took in the campaign which ended with the surrender at Saratoga. At that time he held the rank and discharged the duties of Commissary General, and Brigadier-General. From the meagre records which remain, it seems certain that he employed his whole time during the summer of 1777, in raising men and supplies for the army and sending them on, but when Burgoyne was invested and the men and supplies were on the ground, he took command in person, of the troops from Western New Hampshire and Eastern Vermont. Several certificates like the following are in existence:
      “Headquarters, Saratoga, Oct. 18, 1777.
      This may certify that Col. Webster with a Regiment of New Hampshire Volunteers have faithfully served in the Northern Army, until this date, and are discharged with honor.
      By Gen. Gates' order,
      Jacob Bayley, Brig-Gen.”
      “This certifies that Frederick Obrey (Aubrey) did duty as a surgeon in the Volunteer Company, and in the party under the command of Col. Brown, who was sent to Ticonderoga by order from General Lincoln.
      Jacob Bayley, B. D. G., (Brigadier General).”
      “A return of the Men and Horses employed by Capt. Abel Marsh in carrying flour from Connecticut river to Battenkill for the use of the Northern Army by order of Jacob Bayley, B.D.G., 13 October, 1777.”
      On the back of the return is the following endorsement:
      “This certifies that by direction of Gen. Lincoln I ordered the within supplies of flour which was delivered to the commissary at Battenkill at the time specified when the baggage horses were dismissed.
      Jacob Bayley, B.G.”
      “General Bayley,” says the late Hon. L.E. Chittenden, in a personal contribution to this volume, “is one of the neglected patriots of the Revolution.” His last years were spent among his children; he continued to transact business until nearly the end of his life, and his memory which remained unimpaired, was replete with reminiscences of his long and eventful career, which he would relate with great minuteness. It seems strange to us, that of the many who listened to his narratives, not one of them all seems to have thought of putting them into writing. He has been well called “The Father of Newbury,” and his services to the town and church can hardly be overestimated. He was admitted to the 2d ch. at Newbury. Mass.. (now the 1st ch. at W.N.) in 1744, and was, May 31, 1752, with his wife, dismissed to form, with others, a church at Hampstead. In September, 1764, he became one of the first members of the 1st ch. in this town, and was, with Jacob Kent and James Abbott, one of its first deacons, holding that office during the rest of his life. In person he was about middle height, a stature not exceeded by any of his sons or grandsons, with a muscular, well knit frame, capable of great endurance. Mr. Reuben Abbott, who had known him well, said that he could easily trace the lineaments of his countenance, in all of his descendants whom he had met. His mind was not largely informed; he had lived a busy life from boyhood, without time for study, or general reading; he seems to have been well aware of this, and declined responsibilities where a trained intellect was required, but he appears to have possessed the qualities which inspire confidence and esteem, to an unusual degree. His influence with the Indians doubtless prevented many disasters to the frontier, and his sacrifices in behalf of the American cause contributed toward the establishment of our independence. His fame will always be great in this town; but to the present generation, even of his descendants, the services which he rendered are very imperfectly understood. His sphere of operations was narrow, but in it no man could have accomplished a more durable work; his loyalty to the patriotic cause was never questioned, and his course during the war has never needed apology or required vindication. His correspondence was very extensive. Many of his letters have been printed but large numbers of them remain in manuscript. The New York state papers and those of New Hampshire contain some of them, and, had space permitted, numbers of those, hitherto unpublished, would have found place in this volume. He d. March 1, 1815, in the house of his son, Isaac, in which the latter’s grandson, Henry W. Bailey now lives, his wife having preceded him, June 1, 1809. [1]
    Person ID I90205  Schirado
    Last Modified 31 July 2012 

    Father Capt. Joshua Bayley,   b. 30 October 1685, Newbury, MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 October 1762, Newbury, MA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years) 
    Mother Sarah Coffin,   b. 16 May 1686, Haverhill, MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 November 1768, Newbury, MA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years) 
    Married 4 February 1706  Newbury, MA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Family ID F59463  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family/Spouse Prudence Noyes,   b. 10 April 1725, Newbury, MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 June 1809, Newbury, Orange County, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years) 
    Married 16 October 1745  Newbury, MA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Ephraim Bayley,   b. 5 October 1746, Newbury, MA Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. Abigail Bayley,   b. 15 January 1748, Hampstead, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Noyes Bayley,   b. 16 February 1750, Hampstead, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Joshua Bayley,   b. 11 June 1753, Hampstead, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 July 1841  (Age 88 years)
     5. Jacob Bayley,   b. 3 October 1755, Hampstead, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 June 1837, Newbury, Orange County, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years)
     6. Ephraim Bayley,   b. 1 October 1757, Hampstead, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 July 1825, Lyman, Grafton County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years)
     7. James Bayley,   b. 1 October 1757, Hampstead, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 April 1784  (Age 26 years)
     8. Amherst Bayley,   b. 10 December 1760,   d. 6 January 1783  (Age 22 years)
     9. Abner Bayley,   b. 16 January 1762, Newbury, Orange County, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1783  (Age 20 years)
     10. John Bayley,   b. 20 May 1765, Newbury, Orange County, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 July 1839, Newbury, Orange County, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years)
     11. Isaac Bayley,   b. 28 June 1767, Newbury, Orange County, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 August 1850, Newbury, Orange County, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
    Family ID F59457  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Sources 
    1. [S592] Frederic Palmer Wells, (Caledonian, St. Johnsbury VT, 1902).

    2. [S338] (Essex Instutite, Salem MA, 1911).


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